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November 6, 2018 

Election results on key state propositions and local measures with 100% of precincts reporting.

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YES ON PROP 1: VETERANS AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING ACT

Proposition 1 passed by a solid margin of 54.1% YES to 45.9% NO.

Proposition 1 authorizes the state to issue $4 billion in general obligation bonds to build and provide affordable housing for veterans, working families, people with disabilities, and seniors.

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YES ON PROP 2: USE MILLIONAIRE’S TAX REVENUE FOR HOMELESSNESS PREVENTION HOUSING BONDS

Proposition 2 easily won with 61.1% YES and 38.9% NO.

Proposition 2 authorizes the state to use existing funds, raised from 2004’s Proposition 63, on $2 billion in revenue bonds to invest in supportive housing linked to intensive services for people with serious mental illness who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.

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YES ON PROP 3: WATER INFRASTRUCTURE AND WATERSHED CONSERVATION BOND INITIATIVE

Proposition 3 lost with 52.3% voting NO vs. 47.7% YES. 

Proposition 3 would have authorized the state to issue $8.877 billion in general obligation bonds for water-related infrastructure and environmental projects.

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YES ON PROP 4: CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL BOND

Proposition 4 handily won with 60.6% voting YES vs. 39.4% NO.

Proposition 4 authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds over 15 years to provide for a Children’s Hospital Bond Act Fund. The fund would be used to award grants to children’s hospitals for capital improvements, such as construction, expansion, renovation, and equipment projects.

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NO ON PROP 6: GAS TAX REPEAL

Proposition 6 lost with 55.1% voting NO vs. 44.9% YES.

Proposition 6 would have repealed the recent increase in the gas tax and other fuel and car fees and require voter approval for all transportation-related tax increases in the future. Taxes to have been rolled back included a 12 cent hike in the gasoline excise tax, a four percent increase in the diesel sales tax, as well as a new annual vehicle fee based on the value of the car or truck.

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NO ON PROP 10: LOCAL RENT CONTROL INITIATIVE

Proposition 10 lost by a wide margin of 61.7% NO to 44.9% YES.

Proposition 10 would have repealed the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act, thus allowing local governments to adopt rent control ordinances—regulations that govern how much landlords can charge tenants for renting apartments and houses. Proposition 10 would have also required that local government rent control ordinances not abridge a fair rate of return for landlords.

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YES ON MEASURE AA: MILPITAS UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Measure AA passed by a wide margin of 68.63% YES vs. 31.37% NO.

Measure AA authorizes the district to issue up to $284,000,000 in bonds to fund upgrades to facilities, equipment, and technology.

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YES ON MEASURE BB: SANTA CLARA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Measure BB passed by a wide margin of 68.63% YES vs. 31.37% NO.

Measure BB authorizes the district to issue up to $720,000,000 in bonds to fund critically needed safety and modernization projects.

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NO ON MEASURE HH: EAST PALO ALTO ANNUAL PARCEL TAX

Measure HH won by a huge margin of 76.9% YES to 23.1% NO.

Measure HH imposes an annual parcel tax in East Palo Alto on commercial office space over 25,000 square feet at a rate of $2.50 per square foot, estimated to annually raise $1,675,000 to fund programs for City residents.

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NO ON MEASURE P: MOUNTAIN VIEW BUSINESS LICENSE TAX

Measure P won by a wide margin of 69.22% YES vs. 30.78% NO.

Measure P imposes a business license tax in Mountain View of between $8 and $149 per employee on average, with larger companies paying more per employee, generating about $6 million yearly for unrestricted general revenue purposes.

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YES ON MEASURE T: SAN JOSE DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, PUBLIC SAFETY AND INFRASTRUCTURE BOND ISSUE

Measure T passed receiving more than the 2/3rds required with 69.4% YES vs. 30.96% NO.

Measure T allows the City of San Jose to issue $650 million of General Obligation Bonds for the acquisition, construction and completion of certain municipal improvements.

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YES ON MEASURE U: SAN JOSE COUNCIL SALARY CHARTER AMENDMENTS

Measure U passed by a huge margin of 84.85% YES vs. 15.15% NO.

Measure U amends the city charter to remove the city council and mayor’s ability to approve their salaries, to require the salary-setting commission to adjust base salaries every five years, to limit salary increases according to inflation, and to allow the council to place competing measures on local ballots.

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YES ON MEASURE V: SAN JOSE AFFORDABLE HOUSING BOND

Measure V received 61.59% YES votes vs. 38.41% NO, but it did not pass because it did not receive the requisite 2/3rds to win.

Measure V would have authorized the city to issue up to $450 million in bonds through an average levy of 8 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. Although voters approved a $950 million bond at the county level in 2016 to permanently house homeless people, the new measure is broader and specific to San Jose, meaning the city could consider proposals for teacher housing, transitional housing or mixed-income housing. The measure specified that at least a third of the money should go to very low-income people, earning 30 percent or less of the area’s median income, which is north of $100,000 for a family of four.

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YES ON MEASURE W: WEST VALLEY-MISSION COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Measure W passed with 58.91 voting YES vs. 41.09 NO.

Measure W authorizes the district to issue up to $698,000,000 in bonds to fund updates to facilities and technology.

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YES ON MEASURE W: SAN MATEO COUNTY ROADS AND TRANSIT SALES TAX

Measure W received 66.85 YES, the required 2/3rds to win, vs. 33.15 NO.

Measure W increases the sales tax in San Mateo County by 0.5% for 30 years, beginning on July 1, 2019. Proceeds from this measure would be used to pay for transportation related improvement projects throughout the County, as specified in the District’s Congestion Relief Plan.

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YES ON MEASURE X: GAVILAN JOINT COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT 

Measure X passed with 59.87 voting YES vs. 40.13% NO.

Measure X authorizes the district to issue up to $248,000,000 in bonds to upgrade classrooms, labs, and career training facilities to current industry standards.

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CANDIDATE QUESTIONNAIRE

Sixty-five candidates, running for Mayor or City Council in eighteen cities across three counties, responded to the Leadership Group’s November 2018 Candidate Questionnaire on where they stand on important state, regional and local issues.

To find out where your candidates stand, please check out the Candidate Questionnaire Report (the linked Table of Contents page takes you directly to the city of your choice).

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